Pharmacognosy Magazine

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2018  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 55  |  Page : 197--207

Naringin ameliorates doxorubicin-induced neurotoxicity In vitro and cognitive dysfunction In vivo


Grandhi Venkata Ramalingayya1, Pawan G Nayak2, Rekha R Shenoy2, Sanchari Basu Mallik2, Karthik Gourishetti2, Shalam M Hussain3, Chamallamudi Mallikarjuna Rao2, Krishnadas Nandakumar2 
1 Department of Pharmacology, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka; Discovery Biology, Suven Life Sciences Ltd., Hyderabad, Telangana, India
2 Department of Pharmacology, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Unaizah College of Pharmacy, Qassim University, Al Malida, KSA

Correspondence Address:
Krishnadas Nandakumar
Department of Pharmacology, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal - 576 104, Karnataka
India

Objectives: The primary objective of the study was to study the neuroprotective potential of naringin (NAR) against doxorubicin (DOX)-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and DOX-induced cognitive deficits (chemobrain) in vivo. Materials and Methods: In vitro methods, viz., 3-[4,5dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay, flow cytometry, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, and neuritogenic and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays, assessed neuroprotective potential of NAR and its aglycone naringenin (NGN) in IMR-32 cells. Chemobrain was developed in Wistar rats on chronic administration of ten cycles of DOX, and episodic memory was assessed using novel object recognition task. Serum cortisol, locomotor activity, and hematological biochemical and histological analysis were carried out. Results: A protective effect of NAR or NGN was observed upon pretreatment with the respective compounds in IMR-32 cells challenged with DOX. Flow cytometry revealed that flavonoids reduced cell cycle changes produced by DOX. In addition, an increase in apoptosis, intracellular ROS generation, and inhibition of neurite growth was noticed in IMR-32 cells with DOX treatment, which was significantly prevented by NAR or NGN pretreatment. Interestingly, NAR (50 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly ameliorated episodic memory deficit associated with DOX without influencing locomotion, upon chronic treatment. NAR also prevented histological changes to major organs observed with DOX. Conclusion: NAR showed neuroprotective potential and may be used as an adjuvant therapy for amelioration of neurocognitive complications associated with chemotherapy in cancer survivors. Abbreviations used: CKL: Creatine kinase level; COX: Cyclooxygenase; DMEM: Dulbecco's modified eagle media; DOX: Doxorubicin; FBS: Fetal bovine serum; MTT: 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide; NAR: Naringin; NGN: Naringenin; NORT: Novel object recognition task; NOS: Nitric oxide synthase; QOL: Quality of life; RA: retinoic acid.


How to cite this article:
Ramalingayya GV, Nayak PG, Shenoy RR, Mallik SB, Gourishetti K, Hussain SM, Rao CM, Nandakumar K. Naringin ameliorates doxorubicin-induced neurotoxicity In vitro and cognitive dysfunction In vivo.Phcog Mag 2018;14:197-207


How to cite this URL:
Ramalingayya GV, Nayak PG, Shenoy RR, Mallik SB, Gourishetti K, Hussain SM, Rao CM, Nandakumar K. Naringin ameliorates doxorubicin-induced neurotoxicity In vitro and cognitive dysfunction In vivo. Phcog Mag [serial online] 2018 [cited 2022 Jun 29 ];14:197-207
Available from: http://www.phcog.com/article.asp?issn=0973-1296;year=2018;volume=14;issue=55;spage=197;epage=207;aulast=Ramalingayya;type=0