Pharmacognosy Magazine

RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year
: 2009  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 19  |  Page : 51--54

Antidiabetic activity of aqueous extract of Eucalyptus citriodorahook. in alloxan induced diabetic rats


Arjun Patra1, Shivesh Jha2, Alakh N Sahu3,  
1 College of Pharmacy, IFTM, Moradabad – 244 001, U.P; Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra – 835 215, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India
2 Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra – 835 215, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India
3 Department of Pharmaceutics, IT, BHU, Varanasi, India

Correspondence Address:
Arjun Patra
College of Pharmacy, IFTM, Moradabad – 244 001, U.P; Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra – 835 215, Ranchi, Jharkhand
India

Abstract

The present study was undertaken to study the antidiabetic activity of the aqueous extract of Eucalyptus citriodora Hook. leaf in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. The activity of the extract was studied on glucose loaded and alloxan-induced diabetic rats. In both the tests, the extract has shown significant and considerable antidiabetic effect in a dose dependent manner. On oral administration of the extract at a dose of 500 mg/kg of body weight, the reduction of blood glucose level was 22.9% after 4th hr and on continuous administration the reduction in blood glucose level after 21 days was 49.9 and 56.8% with dose of 250 and 500 mg/kg of body weight respectively. Aqueous extract of leaves of E. citriodora exhibited significant antidiabetic activity which was comparable with the standard drug Glibenclamide.



How to cite this article:
Patra A, Jha S, Sahu AN. Antidiabetic activity of aqueous extract of Eucalyptus citriodorahook. in alloxan induced diabetic rats.Phcog Mag 2009;5:51-54


How to cite this URL:
Patra A, Jha S, Sahu AN. Antidiabetic activity of aqueous extract of Eucalyptus citriodorahook. in alloxan induced diabetic rats. Phcog Mag [serial online] 2009 [cited 2021 Jun 23 ];5:51-54
Available from: http://www.phcog.com/text.asp?2009/5/19/51/59783


Full Text

 Introduction



Eucalyptus citriodora Hook. (Myrtaceae) is also known as lemon scented gum or citron scented gum and found in different states as Assam, Madhya Pradesh, Bihar, Kerala, Maharashtra and Uttar Pradesh [1],[2] . Incorporation of Eucalyptus globulus in diet (62.5 g/kg) and drinking water (2.5 g/kg) or administration of aqueous extract (0.25 - 0.5 g/kg) reduced the hyperglycemia and associated weight loss of streptozotocin treated mice [3] . The pronounced anti HIV, antitumor, antigranulation, antimalarial, antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective activities of nonvolatile constituents of some species of eucalyptus has been reported. Some of the nonvolatile constituents of Eucalyptus citriodora are triterpenes, tannins, flavonoids, anthocyanins, phenolic compounds etc. [4] . Eucalyptus leaf in folk medicine is used internally for the treatment of diabetes, asthma, fever, whooping cough, liver and gallbladder complaints, ulcer, neuralgia, stomatitis, pain, gonorrhea, rheumatism and as a gastrointestinal remedy [5] . Present study was carried out to evaluate the antidiabetic activity of the aqueous extract of leaves of E. citriodora.

 Materials and Methods



Plant material collection and preparation of extract

The leaves of E. citriodora were collected from Ranchi, India and authenticated through Birsa Agricultural University, Kanke, Ranchi and a voucher specimen was preserved in the Department of Pharmaceutical sciences, Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra, Ranchi. The leaves were dried in oven at 45°C and then coarsely powdered. The powdered material was extracted with water by maceration. The extract was dried by rotary vacuum evaporator. The yield of the aqueous extract of E. citriodora (ECAE) was 1.6 % w/w.

Animals

Albino rats of either sex weighing between 140 - 180 g were used for the experiment. Approval was taken from the Institutional Animal Ethical Committee (IAEC) of Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra. Animals were allowed free access to standard pellet diet and water ad libitum.

Effect of E. citriodora extract on oral glucose tolerance in rats

Fasted rats were divided into three groups of six animals each. Group I served as glucose control. Group II & III were treated with plant extract (250 mg/kg of body weight) and glibenclamide (600 μg/kg of body weight) orally respectively. After 30 min of extract and standard drug administration, the rats of all the groups were treated with 2 g/kg of glucose. Blood glucose levels were determined by collecting the blood from retro orbital plexus at 30 and 90 min after glucose administration by O-toluidine method [6],[7] .

Effect of E. citriodora extract on alloxan-induced diabetic rats

Diabetes was induced in rats by a single i.p. injection of 150 mg/kg of body weight of alloxan monohydrate in sterile saline [8] . After 72 hr of alloxan injection, the diabetic rats (glucose level > 250 mg/dl) were separated [9] and divided into four groups of six animals each as below:

Group I: Diabetic control rats received distilled water

Group II: Diabetic rats treated with ECAE 250 mg/kg of body weight in distilled water.

Group III: Diabetic rats treated with ECAE 500 mg/kg of body weight in distilled water.

Group IV: Diabetic rats treated with Glibenclamide 600 μg/kg of body weight in aqueous solution.

Blood samples were collected from retro orbital plexus at zero time (before extract and glibenclamide administration) and after 2, 4, 6 hr of treatment. Blood glucose levels were determined by O-toluidine method. In multidose study (sub acute study) the animals were treated with the same dose for three weeks. Blood glucose levels were determined by O-toluidine method on 7 th , 14 th and 21 st day of treatment.

Antioxidant activity

Antioxidant activity of the aqueous extract was measured on the basis of the scavenging activity of the stable 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical [10],[11],[12] . Various concentrations of the extract were added to 0.004% methanolic solution of DPPH. After 30 min the absorbance at 517 nm was determined, and the percent inhibition activity was calculated using the following formula.

% inhibition = [(Ac - At) / Ac] Χ 100

Where, Ac = absorbance of control sample and At = the absorbance of test sample.

The IC 50 was determined as the concentration in μg required to scavenge 50% DPPH free radical.

Statistical Analysis

The results were expressed as Mean ± S.D. of six animals and the data were statistically analyzed by student's t-test.

 Results



In glucose tolerance test, the extract has reduced the increased blood glucose level significantly after administration of glucose. The maximum glucose tolerance of the extract was observed at 30 th min [Table 1].

Both in single dose short term study and multidose long term study the extract exhibited significant reduction of blood glucose level in a dose dependent manner. In single dose treatment the reduction of blood glucose level was 19.5 and 22.9 % at a dose of 250 and 500 mg/kg of body weight respectively [Table 2]. In subacute study the reduction of blood glucose after 21 days was 49.9 and 56.8 % with 250 and 500 mg/kg of body weight respectively. These values are comparable with the standard drug Glibenclamide, where the reduction of blood glucose level was 66.6 % [Table 3]. In antioxidant study the IC50 of the extract was found to be 352 μg/ml.

 Discussion



Administration of alloxan causes destruction of β-cells of the pancreas [13] and increases the blood glucose level. Some Flavonoids and saponins isolated from medicinal plants significantly decrease the elevated blood glucose levels [14],[15] . Literature survey suggests the presence of triterpenes, tannins, flavonoids, anthocyanins, phenolic compounds etc. in the nonvolatile fraction of E. citriodora. Flavonoid glycosides stimulate the secretion of insulin in β-cells of the pancreas [16] . Therefore, the significant antidiabetic activity of the aqueous extract of leaves of E. citriodora may be due to the presence of tannins and flavonoids. Further, free radical formation is associated with a number of diseases including diabetes [17],[18] . Hence, the antidiabetic activity may be due to its antioxidant property.

In conclusions, this study shows significant antidiabetic activity of E. citriodora leaf. However, it will be interesting to isolate the compounds responsible for antidiabetic activity and to elucidate their mechanism of action.

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