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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 41  |  Page : 48-54

Antioxidant and anti-lipoxygenase activities of extracts from different parts of Lavatera cretica L. grown in Algarve (Portugal)


1 Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Laboratory of Chemistry of Natural Products, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Algarve, Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal; Department of Biotechnology, LR11-ES31 Biotechnology and Bio-Enhancement of Bio Geo Resources, Higher Institute of Biotechnology of Sidi Thabet Sidi Thabet Biotech Pole, 2020, Manouba University, Tunisia
2 Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Laboratory of Chemistry of Natural Products, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Algarve, Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal
3 Department of Biotechnology, LR11-ES31 Biotechnology and Bio-Enhancement of Bio Geo Resources, Higher Institute of Biotechnology of Sidi Thabet Sidi Thabet Biotech Pole, 2020, Manouba University, Tunisia; Department of Biology, King Khalid University the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Abha, Campuses, Tunisie

Correspondence Address:
Maria da Graça Costa Miguel
Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Laboratory of Chemistry of Natural Products, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Algarve, Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-1296.149743

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Background: Lavatera cretica L. was used in folk medicine as anti-inflammatory among other applications. As inflammation is many times associated with oxidative processes, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the ability of aqueous extracts obtained from different parts of L. cretica to prevent oxidation or inflammation using several methods in vitro. Materials and Methods: The capacity of samples for preventing lipid peroxidation, scavenging free radicals, chelating metal ions, reducing power, and inhibiting lipoxygenase activity was investigated. This last assay also permits to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity. The quantification of total phenols was performed using Folin-Chiocalteu reagent. Results: The highest concentrations of total polyphenols and flavonoids were found in the leaf extract (254.62 ± 6.50 mg gallic acid equivalent/gram; dry weight). Leaf and flower extracts were the most active for scavenging 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt free radicals [Inhibition concentration (IC 50 = 2.88 ± 0.54 and IC50 = 4.37 ± 0.54 ΅g/mL, respectively)], and leaf extract was also the best for scavenging hydroxyl radicals (IC 50 = 0.81 ± 0.05 μg/mL). Bract plus sepal extract possessed the best capacity for preventing lipid peroxidation when lecithin liposome was the lipid substrate (IC 50 = 0.19 ± 0.03 μg/mL) and scavenging superoxide anion radicals (IC 50 = 1.13 ± 0.48 μg/mL). Leaf and flower extracts were the best lipoxygenase inhibitors (IC 50 = 0.013 ± 0.0034 μg/mL in both extracts). Conclusions: L. cretica extracts were able to scavenge free radicals, inhibit lipid peroxidation and lipoxygenase activity. With these attributes, this plant can have an important role in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.


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