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RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 17  |  Page : 75-80

Analyses of Ampelozizyphus amazonicus, a Plant Used in Folk Medicine of the Amazon Region


1 Laboratório de Cromatografia - Departamento de Química - Universidade Federal do Amazonas - Campus Universitário – Setor Sul / Av. Rodrigo Otávio, 3000- Japiim - Manaus / AM, 69077-000, Brazil
2 Laboratório de Plantas Medicinais e Derivados / DPN - Farmanguinhos - FIOCRUZ – R. Sizenando Nabuco, 100 - Manguinhos / RJ, 21041-250, Brazil

Correspondence Address:
Jefferson Rocha de A Silva
Laboratório de Cromatografia - Departamento de Química - Universidade Federal do Amazonas - Campus Universitário – Setor Sul / Av. Rodrigo Otávio, 3000- Japiim - Manaus / AM, 69077-000
Brazil
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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In Brazil, a popular preparation of Ampelozizyphus amazonicus Ducke is widely used to prevent malaria. Physical chemistry analyses such as atomic absorption spectrophotometer, HPLC and antioxidant activity by spectrophotometer were used to evaluate the raw botanic material (stem barks, leaves, twigs and root barks) and extracts of root barks. The chromatographic profile of the 1% root barks preparation of A. amazonicus showed 48.4% of saponins that are important point for the knowledge of this popular formulation. The concentration levels of macronutrients and micronutrients along with phosphorus were obtained from this species. The iron level of the root barks was higher than that observed in the other vegetal material. This result was considered relevant based on the fact that certain malaria-related processes involve the presence of iron and the root barks are the part of the plant used by the population. The DDPH assays showed that the one-percent extracts have no relevant ability as free-radical scavengers or hydrogen donors but these results may be associated to the parasite evolutive cycle and the popular use of the plant for the prophylaxis of malaria. The root barks preparation like the folk use did not present significant toxicity to brine shrimp.


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